Helpful Hints for Inquiry

studio-film-related-items-white-6536533

 

The past few weeks we’ve been introduced to a whole load of exciting new skills to help us in inquiry for the rest of the year. Here are some tips that I’ve learned that I think could help you!

 

PHOTOGRAPHY
Leading lines, Framing, Rule of thirds, positive and negative space.

Leading lines can create a specific feeling and atmosphere, the lines can split  a photo in half. The types of lines, diagonal, vertical, curved, horizontal and converging. With diagonal lines they will have a more impressive composition if they begin in the corner or edge of your image. Horizontal lines look good when you are taking a photo of the horizon or other things.

Frames draw attention to your subject by blocking out other parts of the scene. By placing an object around the edge of your image you can isolate your subject. It doesn’t have to completely cover the edge of your picture. You can choose to have a blurred frame, more in depth, or a focused frame which gives you more of a detailed image. Make sure your frame has a clear outline and doesn’t blend in with your image. Framing can add clutter to your image and make it feel cramped if used wrong.

You divide your image in a noughts and crosses grid or 3 by 3. The subject should never have their eyes (if they have eyes) in the middle. They should be on the top row. Most cameras have a setting that automatically places a grid on the image so you can take an accurate photo. You can use it to cut out unneeded space or clutter. There is a setting on most cameras that automatically puts a rule of thirds on the screen to help you take more professional photos.

Sometimes referred to as white space. The subject is known as the positive space. He object is positive and everything else is negative space. Negative space should be blank and doesn’t take away attention from the positive space. If provides breathing room so your imagine appears uncluttered and adds up to as more engaging composition. The sky is often used as negative space because it is not distracting but sometimes is used as positive space. When used properly, the negative space is a natural balance against positive space in a scene. It is hard to get this balance right. When framing your photo adjust your composition until the positive and negative space in the shot feel balanced against each other. Be generous with the negative space you give and don’t feel you have to cram something interesting into every inch in the image.

 

FILM

60% Pre production 15% Production 25% Post Production

I reckon shot list plan and lots of different camera angle made our films so much better in film. A shot list is basically something used by professionals to make the production stage, filming, go lot quicker and smoother. It Has one column for audio, one column for what you’re going to film and there is one for what types of camera angles you will use. It will look like this before you’ve filled it in:Capture 3

I found it helped so much with filming it only took about 4 hours in total to film everything.  I recommend it to anyone who is making a film with a time limit.

There is a wide range of angles that we learned. The ones I can remember are, Panning, low shot, high shot, mid shot, dolly, establishing, close up, extreme close up and peace to camera.

Panning is just where you start at one point, and swivel the camera side to side slowly to fit everything into the shot. A low shot is where you are on the ground looking up at something. High shots are just the opposite of a low shot. A mid shot is kind of in the middle and shows only a couple of things. Dolly is kind of like a cross between a panning shot and zooming in on something. An establishing shot is kind of like the first slide of a power point and is used to set the scene like a movie’s first scene or something, it kind of lets you know where it is set or what it is about. I think we all know what a close up is but in case you don’t then I’m about to tell you. It is just where you zoom in really close on something like if you had a picture of a man holding a guitar, then the close up would be of just the guitar or of just the man. An extreme close up is just a close up but zoomed even more. Using the same example as before, the picture would be of the man’s face or just the guitar strings or pick or something. Peace to camera is just of someone looking and speaking to the camera, like a news reporter or weatherman.

AUDIO

 

My First Tip From Audio is about the safety of the equipment. To make sure you keep your tripod safe and not broken, when you need to move sets, pull all the legs on the tripod in to and make sure it’s compacted so it’s not easily broken. Take the camera off the tripod and anything like mics and accessories so they can’t fall off. Always put the cap on the lens when you finish using the camera. When filming with the DSLR cameras you need to focus on the person you are filming or it will come out fuzzy. When Using a shotgun mic, you need to screw the blue adapter on the metal side up. ALWAYS remember to turn on the microphone. If You are using the Lapel mic, you need to find a way to conceal it as much as possible. you can put it down your jumper or in your pocket because the whole point of them is so they can’t tell your using a microphone. it is suppose to stay hidden.

My Second tip is when you are filming, try to speak a moderate space away from the mic or you will muffle the sound and make it sound weird. When you use certain mics, you have to speak slightly quieter than usual because if you burst the sound barrier, it will distort the sound and make a kind of screech sound when you watch it back.

 

My Last Tip For you is to have fun and enjoy it while it lasts!